Why Employee …

 Why Employee Happiness Could Be Hurting Your Company! (Yeabsira P)

An upcoming webinar presented by Leadership IQ (http://www.leadershipiq.com) shows that corporate cultures pushing happiness actually have lower employee engagement scores than more competitive and challenging cultures.

 

(PRWEB) April 18, 2012

We’ve all heard the saying that a happy employee is a motivated employee. But new Leadership IQ research, reported in the Wall Street Journal, shows that corporate cultures pushing happiness actually have loweremployee engagement scores than more competitive and challenging cultures.

And other research studies have found that the “happiest” people act more selfishly, are worse at defending their opinions (they produce weaker, less detailed arguments) and are less creative. 
Focusing on employee happiness and hoping that translates into productivity is like doubling the salaries of salespeople and hoping they just magically double their sales. The employee happiness movement has the causality in the wrong order. Happiness (and more importantly fulfillment) should FOLLOW great achievements—you shouldn’t aim to make people happy and then just hope they give you great achievements.

In an upcoming webinar presented on April 26th by Leadership IQ, you’ll see the new research and techniques that push employees past superficial happiness to discover and maximize their unrealized potential, while leaving them beaming with hard-won pride and fulfillment. This is the formula that has driven Apple, Amazon, Google, and other great companies to outperform their competitors while still being recognized as world-class employers.

In this live 60-minute webinar called Why Employee Happiness Could Be Hurting Your Company, you’ll learn: 

  •     Why Social corporate cultures that prioritize happiness actually have lower engagement scores than more competitive and challenging Enterprising cultures
  •     Discover 4 reasons why two-thirds of employees aren’t giving 100% effort(despite billions spent on employee happiness and satisfaction efforts)
  •     Learn 2 questions that will reveal how much discretionary effort your employees are really giving you (and why you should never ask employees if they’re satisfied)
  •     See a disturbing trend emerging from the latest employee survey data (and learn how you can proactively reduce this risk)
  •     Why high-performing employees can’t achieve happiness until their bosses do a better job of managing low performers (and holding them accountable)
  •     If you’re going to measure employees’ fulfillment, there are 3 survey questions you should never ask them (and 5 questions you should ask instead)
  •     Why the CEO of Amazon purposefully set a goal that made his employees feel “awkward and uncomfortable” and how that goal is now their biggest source of employee fulfillment
  •     Why Google’s famous perks (gourmet cafeteria, pub lounge, 20% time) having nothing to do with employee happiness and everything to do with employee productivity
  •     How a few simple changes to your goal-setting processes can inspire employees to try harder and give them a greater sense of self-worth
  •     Get the list of psychological characteristics that differentiate if someone is high-maintenance and needs constant happiness or if they’re high-achievers that want lots of challenges, hard work and the chance to achieve greatness
  •     See new research studies showing that the “happiest” people act more selfishly, are worse at defending their opinions (they produce weaker, less detailed arguments) and are less creative
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About internalmarket

This blog and its accompanying Twitter account have been established as social media learning tools for the Internal Communications and Employee Engagement class at Columbia College Chicago. Through this blog, we will share our observations about current events, change management and employee communications theory, and the application of social media in shaping employee engagement.
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