Youtube to spend 100million to compete with broadcast TV.

By Ian Paul, PCWorld Apr 7, 2011 7:53 AM

“This just might be the year you finally say “Goodbye, cable box” and “Hello, YouTube, Hulu and Netflix,” if the latest online rumors are correct. Google’s YouTube is reportedly hoping to launch about 20 different “channels,” each featuring several hours per week of original content for categories such as sports, arts and entertainment. YouTube channels are simply Web pages built around specific content. The site will reportedly spend as much as $100 million to get its fledgling project off the ground and is in talks with major Hollywood talent agencies to attract content creators to YouTube. The ultimate goal is to get you to watch YouTube the same way you watch TV, according to The Wall Street Journal.”

They found that people where watching at least 4 hours of youtube, “By comparison, the average American watched more than 150 hours per month of broadcast television during the last three months of 2010 and 145 hours per month between July and September 2010, according to the Nielsen Company.”

So more and more people seem to be watching more Television on their computer these days. Youtube isn’t the only one that is trying to take advantage of this, Hulu and Netflix are also getting in the mix as well.
“It’s a good bet that over the next several years, original dramas, news broadcasts, sports and other programming will undergo a radical shift from broadcast TV to online streaming.”

What does this mean for major networks and how does everyone share in the profits.

Ashley F

http://www.pcworld.com/article/224523/youtube_spending_100m_to_compete_with_broadcast_tv.html

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This blog and its accompanying Twitter account have been established as social media learning tools for the Internal Communications and Employee Engagement class at Columbia College Chicago. Through this blog, we will share our observations about current events, change management and employee communications theory, and the application of social media in shaping employee engagement.
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